Chronic Fatigue: Is It All In Your Head? - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

11/3/06

Chronic Fatigue: Is It All In Your Head?

There are doctors who don't believe in chronic fatigue syndrome, in fact, they tell patients it's all in their heads. That's one reason that the government stepped in today by launching a campaign to change that kind of thinking.

The Centers for Disease Control says there is scientific evidence that chronic fatigue syndrome is a real condition that affects about a million Americans, both men and women but mostly women.

"You find out that rest isn't helping and every day you wake up you're more exhausted than you were the day before," said Elly Brosius, a chronic fatigue patient. 

"The doctor doesn't understand it. As a result he says 'you're crazy. You're nuts. Get out of here," said Dr. James Baraniuk, a chronic pain & fatigue center at Georgetown University Hospital.

"We are committed to improving awareness that this is a real illness," said Dr. Julie Gerberding, Director of the Centers for Disease Control. 

So, now, the CDC is launching a new public awareness campaign to educate patients and doctors and convince drug companies that more research needs to be done. Already, studies have linked chronic fatigue syndrome to brain abnormalities and immune system deficiencies.

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