New lead law targets children's library books - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

3/19/09

New lead law targets children's library books

The Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act limits lead amounts to no greater than 600 parts per million. Their goal is to protect children from clothes and toys that could contain these lead levels, but this law also affects other children products you might not have thought of, like classic children's books.

We've heard about the clothes, toys and even motorized bicycles, but now the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act is targeting children's books, too. "Their considering the safety of children, but I think it probably hasn't been shown that these books really contain much lead," said Lubbock Public Library Director Jane Clausen.  

The books in question would be those that were printed before 1985, which is 10% of the children's books at Mahon Library.

But is this new law going too far? Could some of these classic reads really be harmful to children under the age of 12? "When you think of all the millions of kids that have read books that were printed before 1985, I haven't heard of any ill effects of kids that have read books printed before that time," said Clausen. 

Clausen says libraries were granted one year, while the Consumer Product Safety Commission does further testing of these certain books. If tests do show lead levels of at least 600 parts per million then further action needs to be taken. "We would have the opportunity to either test the books or remove them from the shelves," said Clausen.   

Mother Holly Rivera says she appreciates the testing. "I think it's important to be aware of the different toxins that are out there and wherever those might be aware of it," said Rivera.   

And as a mother of a 2-year-old she says it's better to be safe than sorry. "With all the different products from China you have to be very careful with what kids are playing with and you never know," said Rivera.   

A story with two possible endings, but only time will tell. Again the CPSC is taking a year for further testing. Next February a decision with what to do with the children's books will be made.

 

Consumer Product Safety Commission
Looking for the latest news on consumer recalls check out the Consumer Product Safety Commission's web site.

 

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