Campaign Sign Compliance Around the Hub City - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

4/3/03

Campaign Sign Compliance Around the Hub City

With 17 candidates wrangling for voters, campaign signs are becomming more common than tumbleweeds. In past elections, between 10,000 and 20,000 signs have blanketed the city, and where those signs go is closely watched.

"We are pretty strict on sign placement, say for instance in the right-of-way," says Stuart Walker. He's one of 10 code enforcement officers with the City of Lubbock. Part of his job is making sure candidates comply with sign placement rules.

"This sign is a little close to the right-of-way," said Walker, pointing to a banner within 10 feet of the sidewalk.

Finding offenders is not difficult. What's wrong with this picture is basically this sign is too large to be in a residential neighborhood," he said, standing in front of a 32 square foot sign. Add to that the fact that signs can't be posted on fences. "City of Lubbock ordinance prohibits fences from being used as sign supports," said Walker.

At 50th and Indiana a "Langston for Congress" sign is planted a little too close to the intersection. "Well, what we look for, especially at major intersections, is a sign that is not in the vision triangle," he explained. The "vision triangle" is a 25 foot area that's kept clear to ensure drivers can make safe turns.

If anyone has issues with signs obstructing views or not complying with the law, they are encouraged to call the Code Enforcement office at (806) 775-2122.

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