Red Cross - Lessons from Hurricane Katrina - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

Red Cross - Lessons from Hurricane Katrina

By Marsha Thompson - bio | email

JACKSON, MS (WLBT) - It was the perfect storm, but there was no perfect plan in place to handle the catastrophe dealt by Hurricane Katrina. The hurricane left nearly 300 thousand customers without power in central Mississippi.

The Red Cross was overwhelmed by the number of evacuees. There was confusion and long lines for weeks. Hundreds of evacuees filled the coliseum.

Five years later the Red Cross acknowledges mistakes and has changed their "game plan."

"Hurricane Katrina challenged the Red Cross and all organizations. No one expected a million people would need food for one single day. It's what the Red Cross actually did during that. So it challenged us in all areas of our service delivery because of the magnitude so many people needing disaster assistance at one time," said Tamica Smith, Red Cross spokeswoman.

Many organizations, churches and agencies were effectively overwhelmed as hundreds of thousands from Louisiana to Alabama fled to higher ground.

In the past five years, the Red Cross has beefed up its communications and shelters. The number of trained volunteers is up to 95,000 from 25,000 during Katrina.

For more information on Hurricane preparedness go to www.redcross.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS.

©2010 WLBT. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

  • Local News on KCBD.comNewsMore>>

  • Immigrants arrested near Capitol during DACA protest

    Immigrants arrested near Capitol during DACA protest

    Wednesday, July 26 2017 4:57 PM EDT2017-07-26 20:57:09 GMT
    Activists nearing the end of their 37-mile march from a federal detention facility to the Texas Governor’s Mansion on Nov. 21, 2015. (Source: John Jordan for the Texas Tribune)Activists nearing the end of their 37-mile march from a federal detention facility to the Texas Governor’s Mansion on Nov. 21, 2015. (Source: John Jordan for the Texas Tribune)

    A group of protesters were arrested near the state Capitol on Wednesday in a demonstration designed to both challenge the state's position on an Obama-era immigration program and test Travis County’s policies on how it deals with undocumented immigrants.

    A group of protesters were arrested near the state Capitol on Wednesday in a demonstration designed to both challenge the state's position on an Obama-era immigration program and test Travis County’s policies on how it deals with undocumented immigrants.

  • 3rd Annual Back the Badges Blood Drive

    3rd Annual Back the Badges Blood Drive

    Wednesday, July 26 2017 4:56 PM EDT2017-07-26 20:56:14 GMT

    United Blood Services is inviting everyone to one of Lubbock's biggest blood drives! The Back the Badges blood drive is a community blood drive being held to help combat summertime blood shortages at our local hospitals. 

    United Blood Services is inviting everyone to one of Lubbock's biggest blood drives! The Back the Badges blood drive is a community blood drive being held to help combat summertime blood shortages at our local hospitals. 

  • Senate backs bill that would roll back cellphone safety laws in dozens of Texas cities

    Senate backs bill that would roll back cellphone safety laws in dozens of Texas cities

    Wednesday, July 26 2017 4:55 PM EDT2017-07-26 20:55:32 GMT
    A statewide ban on texting while driving goes into effect Sept. 1, 2017. (Source: Tim Park for The Texas Tribune)A statewide ban on texting while driving goes into effect Sept. 1, 2017. (Source: Tim Park for The Texas Tribune)

    The Texas Senate on Wednesday gave tentative approval to a measure that pre-empts local ordinances on drivers’ mobile phone usage, effectively rolling back safety laws in the 45 Texas cities where local governments enforce stricter regulations than the state. 

    The Texas Senate on Wednesday gave tentative approval to a measure that pre-empts local ordinances on drivers’ mobile phone usage, effectively rolling back safety laws in the 45 Texas cities where local governments enforce stricter regulations than the state. 

Powered by Frankly