Books Versus Bucks for Students - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

1/15/04

Books Versus Bucks for Students

"People get mad, some sort of want to cry," said Double T Bookstore Manager Allisyn McDonald. From her description, you'd think she was talking about divorce and in a way, she is. Students parting with greenbacks for hardbacks. "The average that I've seen is about $300," she said.

The price of college textbooks. The stomach churning, eye-rolling, inevitable rendezvous with your wallet. Over the next two weeks, the Double T Bookstore on 19th St. expects to take in over $200,000. The high cost is expected, even joked about. At the end of the checkout aisle there's a Red Raider coupon book. An ad inside reads, "Just spent a small fortune on books, earn over $100 in two weeks by donating plasma."

Normally I spend between $300 and $400," said business major John Davis. He's bracing himself for sticker shock. "I'm guessing $500 or $600," said Meagan Jukes. "They're really expensive," she said.

Why so costly? "Various reasons," said McDonald. "New editions, new books cost more, professors choose which books they want and some are customized for classes," she said.

So what's a students to do? John's checking with a professor who's listed three books for his course to see if all of them are really needed. "Just ask your professor if you need all the books and if you don't, then don't buy them," he said.

Then there's the process of selling them back at the end of the semester. Trying to recoup some of your cash. "But it's never as much as you pay for them," said Meagan. How can you maximize your profit? "The sooner you sell them the more money you get but the more they buy back the value decreases," said Davis. Looks like John's major in business is paying off.

Today's damage? $361.76 for John, and $470.38 for Meagan. And that is about average. Arms weighed down, pockets a lot lighter, and faces dazed. "Sometimes I feel bad," said McDonald. "$745.62," said Allisyn with a grimace. "You try to say it nicely?," asked the reporter. "Yes," she smiled.

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