LP&L apologizes for billing error - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

LP&L apologizes for billing error

Friday, Lubbock Power & Light held a news conference to address customer billing concerns. 

This comes after thousands of customers were hit with rate shock when they received their energy bills for July.

LP&L says a computer error caused some residents to be charged winter rates in June, when the summer rates should have gone in effect. That is a separate matter than the rate hike.

The company apologized for the glitch during the conference.

 "LP&L apologizes for the very personal impact this computer system error has had on our customers and we'll work with our effected customers to minimize this impact," said Gary Zheng, President and CEO of Lubbock Power & Light.

"As the CEO of LP&L, I do want you to know I'm responsible for the actions of these utilities and we will make sure this never happens again.  I can assure you that we'll work tirelessly to make sure it doesn't," Zheng said.

 Zheng says LP&L has payment plans available for their customers who need help paying their bills.

"People can call us and do a payment arrangement unlimited.  You can do 12 payment arrangements every month, so there's no limitation. We may be the only utility that does that," he said.  

The electric utility board will meet on Monday at 3 p.m. to discuss if they are going to attempt to collect the money from those customers who were under billed.

Mayor Robertson says LP&L acted irresponsibly by raising electric rates in June instead of October, as he claims the consultants suggested. 

Several Lubbock citizens have scheduled protest for 7:30 a.m. On Monday at the LP&L building located at 1301 Broadway.

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