City may soon have to pay for state highway maintenance - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

City may soon have to pay for state highway maintenance

LUBBOCK, TX (KCBD) -

Due to a lack of TXDoT funding, the City of Lubbock may soon have to foot the bill for state highway maintenance.

According to the Texas Municipal League, TXDoT is attempting to turn over state highway maintenance to cities across Texas, including Lubbock.

In a statement released Friday, the Texas Municipal League said TXDoT has sent a letter to cities with a population of more than 50,000 people, informing them that state maintenance could soon be their responsibility. Smaller cities nearby could also be affected. This would amount to a $165 million bill across the state.

Bennett Sandlin, Executive Director of the Texas Municipal League says not the city's job.

"We have enough trouble paving our own city streets, which are thousands and thousands of miles of city streets. We don't have money to do the state's job for them," Sandlin said. 

Sandlin says this is TXDoT's plan to make up for their economic shortfalls. 

"TXDoT is obviously under-funded. They need $4 billion in additional funding to maintain the roads," Sandlin said. 

The plan was discussed at a Transportation Commission meeting last month, with further discussion scheduled for Aug. 29.

"TXDoT has the power to stop maintaining some of these roads, that's what we're afraid of," Sandlin said. 

The issue was briefly discussed at last night's council meeting, but city leaders don't have many details yet.

Mayor Glen Robertson says he's waiting to comment until he's given more concrete information.

Copyright 2013 KCBD. All rights reserved.


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