Cooper & Frenship Make Way For Steadfast Growth Of Student Population - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

9/20/04

Cooper & Frenship Make Way For Steadfast Growth Of Student Population

A new freeway, wider roads, and new homes. The foundation to support Lubbock's growth is almost complete, only one thing is missing - new schools.

Take a look at the numbers from school districts in West and South Lubbock. Over the last three years, Frenship has grown by 324 students while Cooper has seen a boost of 452 students and it's that steadfast growth that is demanding change. NewsChannel 11 shows you how both districts are handling the booming student populations.

Frenship & Cooper Experience Enrollment Increases Attributed To Lubbock's Expansion
We've told you about the increase of students in both Frenship and Cooper school districts over the last few years. Both continue to experience the effects of Lubbock's growth.

Coping with the constant growth Lubbock Cooper ISD is experiencing is a task that Deputy Superintendent Thom Vines says the district is already working on. "Currently, we're surveying parents to get a sense of future growth and of course watching the numbers themselves," he explains. An effort which entails going on a door to door campaign along the new homes south of 98th Street within the next month. Vines says it's their way of grasping a sense of what is to come in the next few years. "We've been already talking about a bond probably in about 2006," he says. The program will enable the construction of a new elementary school.

Vines points out that Cooper's North Elementary has experienced a sudden growth in students. The school opened only two years ago and has reached an enrollment of almost 600. "We're already close to tapping out on that building already and we're not even accepting transfers at that building," he says.

Meanwhile, Frenship will begin application of it's $46.8 million bond program passed last September. Superintendent John Thomas says $18 million will be used to expand three elementary schools beginning in November.

The other $28.8 million will help build a new elementary school and middle school which will begin construction in March and scheduled to be complete by the 2006- 2007 school year. "Between the additional classrooms at the existing elementaries and the two new schools, that should accommodate our growth for several years," Thomas tells NewsChannel 11.

  • Local News on KCBD.comNewsMore>>

  • Top Democrat rescinds offer of $25 billion for Trump's wall

    Top Democrat rescinds offer of $25 billion for Trump's wall

    Wednesday, January 24 2018 12:40 AM EST2018-01-24 05:40:16 GMT
    Wednesday, January 24 2018 6:11 AM EST2018-01-24 11:11:23 GMT

    The offer, made last Friday, received scalding criticism from the party's liberal activist base that Democrats had given up too easily in reopening the government without more concrete promises on immigration.

    The offer, made last Friday, received scalding criticism from the party's liberal activist base that Democrats had given up too easily in reopening the government without more concrete promises on immigration.

  • 'Enjoy hell:' Doctor's sentence next for assaulting gymnasts

    'Enjoy hell:' Doctor's sentence next for assaulting gymnasts

    Wednesday, January 24 2018 1:09 AM EST2018-01-24 06:09:28 GMT
    Wednesday, January 24 2018 6:10 AM EST2018-01-24 11:10:39 GMT

    Larry Nassar, 54, pleaded guilty to assaulting seven people, but the sentencing hearing has been open to anyone who said they were a victim.

    Larry Nassar, 54, pleaded guilty to assaulting seven people, but the sentencing hearing has been open to anyone who said they were a victim.

  • Work requirements may prompt more states to expand Medicaid

    Work requirements may prompt more states to expand Medicaid

    Wednesday, January 24 2018 12:39 AM EST2018-01-24 05:39:25 GMT
    Wednesday, January 24 2018 6:02 AM EST2018-01-24 11:02:18 GMT

    Some conservative state lawmakers who have resisted expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act are re-thinking that stance now that the Trump administration is allowing work requirements for low-income recipients.

    Some conservative state lawmakers who have resisted expanding Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act are re-thinking that stance now that the Trump administration is allowing work requirements for low-income recipients.

Powered by Frankly