Roswell school shooter receives maximum sentence - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

Roswell school shooter receives maximum sentence

LUBBOCK, TX (KCBD) - A judge has handed down the maximum sentence to the 12-year-old who opened fire in a Roswell, New Mexico middle school back in January.

The boy pleaded no contest to aggravated battery with a deadly weapon earlier this year.

Following a day-long hearing, the judged ordered the boy to be kept in state custody until he turns 21. His lawyers had asked that he be placed in treatment for two years and then released if doctors determine he's no longer a danger.

The shooting severely injured two students who were airlifted to UMC in Lubbock. Nathaniel Tavarez still lives with hundreds of shotgun pellets in his head and chest. his recovery continues, but he has permanent eye damage.

Kendal Sanders is still has lead pellets embedded in her chest and arm. Doctors have said in both kids, the pellets are too numerous and too deep to be removed.

Nathaniel's mom tells KCBD that when he spoke at today's hearing, there wasn't a dry eye in the courtroom as he described how the pellets in his eye have made it difficult to see. Nathaniel says he has forgiven the shooter. 

An attorney read Kendal's statement. She also said she has forgiven the boy, but that what he did was not okay.

The 12-year-old shooter did apologize to both his classmates.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

RELATED STORY: CMN Miracle Kids: Nathaniel Tavarez and Kendal Sanders


Copyright 2014 KCBD. All rights reserved.



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