34th Street Businesses Confused About City's Plan - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

2/21/05

34th Street Businesses Confused About City's Plan

There are fears but according to business owners, there's also a lot of confusion.  They are not sure what to believe.  A consultant his book says one thing, but they claim city officials are telling them something else.

What's been known as one of the oldest business corriders in Lubbock is becoming a controversy. City Councilman Gary Boren took the lead to help concerned citizens create a revitalization plan. The plan includes making 34th Street more appealing with street enhancements.  But business owner Joel Prock is expressing big reservations.  "They make it like 'Hey we're going to make 34th street beautiful' and what they're really not putting out there is they want to come in and force businesses out," said Prock.

2/21/05
Business Owners Voice Concerns Over 34th Street Improvement Project
Over 300 business owners and concerned citizens showed up for a public hearing Monday night concerning the 34th Street revitalization project.

The city hired a consultant out of Kansas City to make recommendations.  It recommends the city to build corner commercial centers. Which means for businesses like Prock Automotive, they would have to relocate. And that concerns many buisness owners.

Political watchdog Mikel Ward is concerned about how future leaders might interpret the revitalization plan.  "What Gary Boren is talking about are sewer lines, repaving and nothing that's in the book. That's fine too but we've got to make clear there is a danger in the book and even adopting it as a vague guideline for the future we need to look at it very closely."

2/10/05
Enhancing an Old Lubbock Business Corridor
Lubbock city planners want to build a healthier business environment along 34th Street.

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