Proposed Senate Bill could weaken Texas top 10 percent rule - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

Proposed Senate Bill could weaken Texas top 10 percent rule

(Source: Texas Tech University) (Source: Texas Tech University)
LUBBOCK, TX (KCBD) -

A proposal that would weaken the top 10 percent rule for Texas high school seniors is that much closer to seeing a vote in the Senate.

This after Senate Bill 2119 passed out of the education committee on Wednesday.

If passed, this new bill would allow state universities, including Texas Tech, Texas A&M and U-T to cap the number of 10 percent enrollees at 30 percent of their incoming students.

"I think it's hard to know for sure how to feel on this issue. I feel like there's advantages and disadvantages on both sides of this," says Tammy Edmonson, the Director of Counseling and College Career Readiness within Lubbock ISD.

Edmonson prepares students for college every day.

"I think for advantages, it would allow a more diverse incoming freshman class into colleges across the state, because it allows them more flexibility in who they select," says Edmonson.

"A little bit of a disadvantage, we're fortunate that we're a larger district, um, but if you're a student that's come from a very small district...I feel like it's probably gonna limit some of those students, as far as the colleges, just because of those class sizes, and maybe they weren't offered the same opportunities for academics, or extra-curricular activities that a student at a larger school district would have," says Edmonson.

For Texas Tech Graduate Gary De Leon, who was admitted to Texas Tech in 2007, and received scholarships based on his top 10 percent status as well as his SAT and ACT scores. He says his life would be very different if this rule had been in effect.

"If I didn't have that, then I would have, it would have been tough to choose. I probably would have had to go somewhere closer to home like UTEP," De Leon says.

De Leon says there was an advantage to knowing he was guaranteed acceptance to every public university in the state.

"I think the best part about being accepted, was my stress level stayed low."

Edmonson says she's hopeful that if this does pass, this will help to motivate students to get involved beyond academics.

"I think it might allow actually some students to say hey, I'm gonna take this course, or that course, because it will help me to be more rounded."

Something De Leon agrees with.

"Be part of student council, be part of the football team, be part of cheerleading, be part of orchestra, as much as you can be out there, while also keeping your grades. That's what universities want to see at this point, can you handle your stress level of having fun outside the classroom and also be a great student as well."

Texas Tech officials say they don't anticipate much change to Texas Tech's enrollment process.

Chris Cook gave us this statement on Thursday night: "If the Senate Bill were to pass, I don't anticipate it influencing our admissions processes. Up to 30 percent of the entering freshmen could be selected on the basis of Top 10 percent.  We would undertake a holistic review of all other applicant and essentially continue admitting the same students."

Copyright 2017 KCBD. All rights reserved.

  • Local News on KCBD.comNewsMore>>

  • NRA links school violence to Ritalin but experts deny link

    NRA links school violence to Ritalin but experts deny link

    Sunday, May 20 2018 6:51 PM EDT2018-05-20 22:51:57 GMT
    Monday, May 21 2018 3:03 PM EDT2018-05-21 19:03:32 GMT
    (Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP). Flags fly at half staff in front of the justice center at Santa Fe, Texas on Sunday, May 20, 2018. Congregations in this deeply religious community near Houston gathered Sunday for their first worship servic...(Elizabeth Conley/Houston Chronicle via AP). Flags fly at half staff in front of the justice center at Santa Fe, Texas on Sunday, May 20, 2018. Congregations in this deeply religious community near Houston gathered Sunday for their first worship servic...
    The National Rifle Association's incoming president is linking school shootings to using medications such as Ritalin.
    The National Rifle Association's incoming president is linking school shootings to using medications such as Ritalin.
  • Trump thrusts abortion fight into crucial midterm elections

    Trump thrusts abortion fight into crucial midterm elections

    Friday, May 18 2018 12:40 AM EDT2018-05-18 04:40:58 GMT
    Monday, May 21 2018 3:03 PM EDT2018-05-21 19:03:30 GMT
    (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File). FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2018 file photo, President Donald Trump speaks to participants of the annual March for Life event, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. The Trump administration will resurrec...(AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File). FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2018 file photo, President Donald Trump speaks to participants of the annual March for Life event, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. The Trump administration will resurrec...

    The Trump administration is resurrecting a Reagan-era rule that would ban federally funded family planning clinics from discussing abortion with women, or sharing space with abortion providers.

    The Trump administration is resurrecting a Reagan-era rule that would ban federally funded family planning clinics from discussing abortion with women, or sharing space with abortion providers.

  • US demands wholesale changes in Iran policies post-nuke deal

    US demands wholesale changes in Iran policies post-nuke deal

    Monday, May 21 2018 8:52 AM EDT2018-05-21 12:52:00 GMT
    Monday, May 21 2018 3:02 PM EDT2018-05-21 19:02:27 GMT
    fasfdafasfda

    Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is laying out the Trump administration's strategy for constraining Iran's nuclear program and opposing its other behavior in the region following President Donald Trump's withdrawal...

    Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is laying out the Trump administration's strategy for constraining Iran's nuclear program and opposing its other behavior in the region following President Donald Trump's withdrawal from the 2015 nuclear deal.

Powered by Frankly