Texas Tech Hurricane Research Team records 108 mph winds from Hu - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

Texas Tech Hurricane Research Team records 108 mph winds from Hurricane Harvey

Provided by TTU Hurricane Research Center Provided by TTU Hurricane Research Center
Provided by TTU Hurricane Research Center Provided by TTU Hurricane Research Center
LUBBOCK, TX (KCBD) -

The Texas Tech Hurricane Research Team is back in Lubbock after collecting data on Hurricane Harvey, including the highest wind speeds they have ever recorded.

The data they collect is used for further hurricane research but also for insurance companies to determine where the hardest hit areas are.

Brian Hirth, a graduate student and research professor for the National Wind Institute, loaded their trailer and headed to Corpus Christi last Wednesday.

"Our objective was to deploy our stick-net platforms along the coastline primarily focused on both capturing the maximum winds on Harvey as it came on shore but then also understanding what the spatial distribution of the wind field was, Hirth said.

They deployed 14 stick-net tripods along the coastline. The stick-nets distribute cell data in real time.

"What you see here is an engineering tripod, surveying tripod we've modified obviously. There's a wind sensor on the top but we are also able to measure temperature, relative humidity, and then in this data enclosure is a barometric pressure sensor and the computer system that logs all the data," Hirth said.

Hirth says they were surprised by the strength of the storm and while flooding is the main story, Harvey had the strongest winds they've ever recorded with their equipment.

"I would just say that a lot of the emphasis for this storm is in Houston because of the torrential flooding, and rightfully so, but the winds in Harvey were the strongest winds that we have ever recorded with these platforms in a hurricane before, and so the areas on the coast near Port Aransas and Rockport those areas are really devastated by the winds and its heart breaking to drive through there and see the damage there," Hirth said.

The team measured wind speeds up to 108 mph.

Their equipment stays fairly low to the ground so wind speeds say around roof top level would have been even higher.

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