Sweetwater man sentenced to 97 months for possessing child porno - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

Sweetwater man sentenced to 97 months for possessing child pornography

Department of Justice Logo Department of Justice Logo

Provided by United States Attorney Northern District of Texas

Timothy Wade Barton, 55, of Sweetwater, Texas, was sentenced this morning by U.S. District Judge Sam R. Cummings to 97 months in federal prison, following his guilty plea in July 2017 to a superseding information charging one count of possession of child pornography, announced U.S. Attorney Erin Nealy Cox of the Northern District of Texas.

Barton, who has been on bond, was ordered to report to the Bureau of Prisons on January 17, 2018.

According to documents filed in his case, between May 9, 2011 and September 23, 2014, Barton possessed a custom-built desktop computer and hard disk drive that contained numerous images and videos of child pornography.  Barton used his computer to search on the Internet to locate material depicting minors engaging in sexually explicit conduct.

The case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative, which was launched in May 2006 by the Department of Justice, to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse.  Led by U.S. Attorney's Offices and the Criminal Division's Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section, Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state and local resources to better locate, apprehend and prosecute individuals, who sexually exploit children, and identify and rescue victims.  For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit http://www.justice.gov/psc/.  For more information about internet safety education, please visit http://www.justice.gov/psc/ and click on the tab "resources."

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) investigated the case.  Assistant U.S. Attorney Steven M. Sucsy was in charge of the prosecution.

  • Local News on KCBD.comNewsMore>>

  • Compulsive video-game playing could be mental health problem

    Compulsive video-game playing could be mental health problem

    Monday, June 18 2018 5:20 AM EDT2018-06-18 09:20:00 GMT
    Monday, June 18 2018 4:51 PM EDT2018-06-18 20:51:08 GMT
    In its latest revision to an international disease classification manual, the U.N. health agency said Monday that classifying "Gaming Disorder" as a separate condition will 'serve a public health purpose for countries.' (Source: Pixabay)In its latest revision to an international disease classification manual, the U.N. health agency said Monday that classifying "Gaming Disorder" as a separate condition will 'serve a public health purpose for countries.' (Source: Pixabay)

    The World Health Organization says that compulsively playing video games now qualifies as a new mental health condition, in a move that some critics warn may risk stigmatizing its young players.

    The World Health Organization says that compulsively playing video games now qualifies as a new mental health condition, in a move that some critics warn may risk stigmatizing its young players.

  • Apple sets up iPhones to relay location for 911 calls

    Apple sets up iPhones to relay location for 911 calls

    Monday, June 18 2018 10:10 AM EDT2018-06-18 14:10:16 GMT
    Monday, June 18 2018 4:50 PM EDT2018-06-18 20:50:49 GMT
    Apple will try to drag the U.S.'s outdated 911 emergency calling system into the 21st century. (Source: Pixabay, file)Apple will try to drag the U.S.'s outdated 911 emergency calling system into the 21st century. (Source: Pixabay, file)

    Apple will try to drag the U.S.'s outdated 911 emergency calling system into the 21st century.

    Apple will try to drag the U.S.'s outdated 911 emergency calling system into the 21st century.

  • Trump digs in on immigration amid family separation crisis

    Trump digs in on immigration amid family separation crisis

    Monday, June 18 2018 4:20 AM EDT2018-06-18 08:20:01 GMT
    Monday, June 18 2018 4:41 PM EDT2018-06-18 20:41:51 GMT
    (Butch Comegys/The Times-Tribune via AP). U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks on immigration policy and law enforcement actions at Lackawanna College in downtown Scranton, Pa., on Friday, June 15, 2018.(Butch Comegys/The Times-Tribune via AP). U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks on immigration policy and law enforcement actions at Lackawanna College in downtown Scranton, Pa., on Friday, June 15, 2018.

    Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a new "zero-tolerance" policy that refers all cases of illegal entry for criminal prosecution.

    Nearly 2,000 children were separated from their families over a six-week period in April and May after Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced a new "zero-tolerance" policy that refers all cases of illegal entry for criminal prosecution.

Powered by Frankly