Californians will vote on dividing into 3 states - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

Californians will vote on dividing into 3 states

The Cal 3 initiative would split the state into North California, California and South California. (Source: CNN) The Cal 3 initiative would split the state into North California, California and South California. (Source: CNN)

(RNN) – Will there soon be three Californias? Voters will decide this fall.

The Cal 3 initiative, which would split the state into North California, California and South California, collected more than 400,000 valid signatures, more than double the amount needed to qualify for the ballot.

“This milestone is a testament to the energized spirit of Californians wanting to create a better future for themselves and their communities,” said Citizens for Cal 3 spokeswoman Peggy Grande.

“This November, all Californians have the opportunity to send the message they are ready for solutions to our most pressing state issues in failing education, crumbling infrastructure, sky-high taxes and stagnation in state government.”

Each proposed state would have from 12 to 14 million people.

Northern California - This would include 40 counties including the San Francisco Bay Area and the remaining counties north of Sacramento.

California - This would include six counties: Los Angeles, Ventura, Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Monterey and San Benito counties.

Southern California - This would include 12 counties: San Diego, San Bernardino, Orange, Riverside, Mono, Madera, Inyo, Tulare, Fresno, Kings, Kern and Imperial counties.

“The growing discontent with the ineffectiveness of the current state government system is apparent with the success of this first step,” Grande said. “All Californians deserve more from their state, and with Cal 3, more regional responsiveness and more meaningful results will create a promising future for everyone.”

If voters approve the measure, it would still have to be ratified by Congress.

Copyright 2018 Raycom News Network. All rights reserved.

  • National politicsPolitics in the US: ImmigrationMore>>

  • Melania Trump dons 'I really don't care, do u?' jacket

    Melania Trump dons 'I really don't care, do u?' jacket

    Friday, June 22 2018 6:29 AM EDT2018-06-22 10:29:55 GMT
    Friday, June 22 2018 8:45 AM EDT2018-06-22 12:45:42 GMT
    (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik). First lady Melania Trump boards a plane at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., Thursday, June 21, 2018, to travel to Texas.(AP Photo/Andrew Harnik). First lady Melania Trump boards a plane at Andrews Air Force Base, Md., Thursday, June 21, 2018, to travel to Texas.
    First lady Melania Trump wore a jacket that read "I really don't care, do u?" as she boarded a flight Thursday to a facility housing migrant children separated from their parents.
    First lady Melania Trump wore a jacket that read "I really don't care, do u?" as she boarded a flight Thursday to a facility housing migrant children separated from their parents.
  • The Latest: Governor says Arkansas base may house migrants

    The Latest: Governor says Arkansas base may house migrants

    Thursday, June 21 2018 1:04 PM EDT2018-06-21 17:04:38 GMT
    Friday, June 22 2018 8:45 AM EDT2018-06-22 12:45:23 GMT
    Mayors who gathered at a holding facility for immigrant children at Texas' border with Mexico say that President Trump has failed to address a humanitarian crisis of his own making.
    Mayors who gathered at a holding facility for immigrant children at Texas' border with Mexico say that President Trump has failed to address a humanitarian crisis of his own making.
  • WHAT'S HAPPENING: A struggle for next steps on immigration

    WHAT'S HAPPENING: A struggle for next steps on immigration

    Thursday, June 21 2018 6:12 AM EDT2018-06-21 10:12:18 GMT
    Friday, June 22 2018 8:45 AM EDT2018-06-22 12:45:04 GMT
    WHAT'S HAPPENING: House GOP leaders are working furiously to get reluctant Republicans on board in hopes of resolving broader immigration issues ahead of the November midterm elections.
    WHAT'S HAPPENING: House GOP leaders are working furiously to get reluctant Republicans on board in hopes of resolving broader immigration issues ahead of the November midterm elections.
Powered by Frankly