What can TABC do to Better Protect the Public? - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

3/24/06

What can TABC do to Better Protect the Public?

Is the Texas Alcohol Beverage Commission doing everything it can to crack down on intoxicated situations in Lubbock? Some say yes, others say TABC could do a better job.

The TABC has several sting operations; sales to intoxication person stings and sales to minor stings to name a few.

TABC says they are doing everything they can to ensure public safety but they want to know what else can be done?

Sylvia Mendez's sister was killed by a drunk driver in Slaton three years ago. She feels TABC needs to have more of a presence in smaller communities. "I think there is not enough proper training in a smaller city," said Sylvia.

TABC Lieutenant Gene Anderson told her the agency will consider her opinion. Captain Dan Cullers says they will take the public's input and present every idea to their commission in Austin. The commission could consider the ideas for possible policy changes.

Jake's Sports Cafe owner Scott Stephenson is all about changing some policies. He thinks the TABC is doing a great job, but thinks servers and bartenders should be licensed rather than certified.

Stephenson says, that way if they break the law, the license is taken away and they can't serve alcohol for months. "Six months ago, I fired a bartender. He got a job at another bar. They revoked his TABC certification, but the law says you have got to get another one with in 30 days if you want to work as a bartender. So he went and paid $25. Now he's serving at another bar, and nobody knows anything about it," said Scott.

TABC is making their presentation to the commission in Austin next Thursday.

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