Immigration Protests Move Into Lubbock - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

4/30/06

Immigration Protests Move Into Lubbock

It's called the Border Protection, Anti terrorism, and Illegal Control Act, that now makes it a felony offense to anyone harboring or living in the U.S. illegally. The movement to change the law has now made it's way to Lubbock, as boycotts, rallies, and peaceful protests are scheduled all over our city.

Hundreds of undocumented workers, local employers, churches and protestors are all planning to walk in peace in hopes to make changes to the law. Two resolutions were sent to local lawmakers showing how they believe the act hurts everyone. Protestors say the act will hurt the economy, break up families, compromise church values, and bring us into an "iron curtain" communist era by building a 700 mile fence on the U.S. Mexico border. They also ask to consider a more reasonable path for immigrants to gain citizenship.

Tavita Dorow from the West Texas Organizing Strategy says, "Yes, we need to protect our borders, but we need to help those individuals who are also needed in this country by many employers, for a way to become citizens, and right now that's not in the law."

Protestors say only five percent of the workforce is undocumented, and they contribute $7-billion a year to Social Security; money which they will never be able to draw from. They also contribute to taxes in sales and property taxes.

The Immigration March and Rally will be a peaceful walk that will start from St. Joseph's Catholic Church and end at the Lubbock County Courthouse. The rally begins Monday May 1st at 11:30 a.m. The march and rally is open to everyone.

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