Interest In Concealed Handguns Is On The Rise - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

7/17/07

Interest In Concealed Handguns Is On The Rise

Recent violence in Lubbock appears to have sparked a larger interest in concealed handgun licenses, so NewsChannel 11 taking a closer look into what it takes to receive one of those permits.

"The object of carrying a weapon is to prevent things from happening," Beverly Ellis, owner of Gun Shak in southwest Lubbock County said. 

Ellis is also a concealed handgun license instructor.  Before you can get a conceal-carry license from the Department of Public Safety, you'll have to spend hours of class time with her, or at least another instructor like Ellis, and it appears more people in Lubbock are up to the challenge.

"In the last two or three months there's been a much greater interest.  With all the things that have been going on, they just feel like they want to be prepared, in the event that something happens," Ellis said. 

"I am safer," Paul Bean said.

Bean has a conceal-carry permit, and he takes his weapon with him almost everywhere.

"I just feel like citizens have a right to protect themselves and their family and their property," Bean said. 

To carry a gun in public folks must first pass an extensive background check and complete ten hours of training, which includes learning all the laws and safety measures.  They also must demonstrate proficiency with their handgun. But those who carry say there's another step that comes before all of the training.

"You must a have a long, hard talk with yourself and say yes, I am prepared to take someone's life if mine or my family or my friends are in danger, and if you're not prepared to do that, don't get one," Bean said. 

Ellis says some people are taking her course just to learn how to handle a gun for home protection, and not necessarily to carry, so there are different reason why people take the class.

To learn more about getting a concealed handgun permit, click here.

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