Storms Drown Out Potential Profit - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

9/28/07

Storms Drown Out Potential Profit

Recent storms could drown out some of the profit at the South Plains Fair.  For many local organizations this is their main fundraising event, but when people aren't there, they can't make money.

Most of the food vendors at the fair are raising money for different non-profit groups, but two days of rain dropped fair attendance.  Now, vendors are hoping for sunny skies to make up for money lost.

"We were down about 42% in carnival and about 50% at the gates," Fair Manager Herb Higgs said. 

Wednesday's strong storm had people running for cover at the fair.

"It did affect us rather heavily," Lubbock Optimist Club Member Chuck Anderson said. 

"It kind of blew everybody out of here," The Bridge volunteer Christy Leeze said. 

"People out here on the street that were waiting to get on the fairgrounds actually turned their cars around and drove the other direction," Higgs said. 

That's bad news for organizations that depend on fairgoers.

"It's our main fundraiser," Leeze said. 

"It certainly supports what we're doing at Ronald McDonald House Charities," volunteer Sandy Peters said. 

"This is the only fundraiser we have all year," Anderson said. 

So, when the rains keep people inside, it's not just the vendors that are losing out, but also the community.

"All of our money goes to scholarships," Anderson said. 

"Helping troubled youth in Lubbock," Leeze said. 

Now, vendors are hoping to make up for lost profits, and they'll need two ingredients, the sun and you.

"We need some big days here," Peters said. 

"We'd like some more to come out," Leeze said. 

"If the weather stays good, we should have another record day, and Saturday usually is a record day," Anderson said. 

Folks still have Friday night and all day Saturday to head out to the fair and enjoy some food, and what a tasty way to support our local non-profit groups.

Click here for a complete list of events at the Panhandle South Plains Fair.

9/24/07
History of the Panhandle South Plains Fair
It's known as "The Granddaddy of West Texas Fairs" and ranks second only to Dallas' State Fair of Texas in attendance and continuous history. NewsChannel 11's Christy Moreland tells us how the fair got it's start.

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