Risks for a First Born Baby - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

4/24/02

Risks for a First Born Baby

The first baby of the family may get a lot of extra attention, but a new study says that the first born may also be the most likely to get Heart Disease. The study looked at nearly 350 heart patients and found the first born had nearly double the risk of Heart Disease as their siblings. The researchers couldn't find any big differences in high blood pressure, cholesterol, or Diabetes. In fact, smoking occurred less often among the first born, but the biggest factor is stress, and the first born are more likely to be hard-driven, easy to anger, and highly motivated, all qualities which studies have shown can play a role in an increased risk of Heart Disease.

While more research is needed to better understand the increased heart risk in this group, researchers say their findings suggest that along with high blood pressure and cholesterol, doctors may want to add a question about birth order to their heart history checklist. Researchers note that social and environmental factors and educational opportunities are often different for firstborns than for their siblings, which may also influence health in adulthood.

The study was conducted in Milan, Italy and is being presented at the American Heart Association's Asia Pacific Scientific forum. Researchers found that 46.7% of the CHD patients were firstborn, almost double the prevalence of 29.3% in the reference population. Being the firstborn child in a family may make a person more likely to develop Coronary Disease, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association's Asia Pacific Scientific Forum. The study authors speculate that firstborns may have a more coronary-prone, type A personality, marked by increased competitiveness, although the study did not look at that factor directly.

"After many years of practice, we noticed a prevalence of firstborns among people affected by Coronary Heart Disease (CHD). Primogeniture, a term for the eldest child, has been considered a possible determinant of various diseases, but, to the best of our knowledge, its association with CHD has never been investigated," says Dr. Maurizio Ferratini, Head of the Cardiovascular Rehabilitation Unit of Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi in Milan, Italy.

"Biological factors, social, and environmental variables and educational opportunities are different in firstborns than those of higher birth order subjects. This may influence the incidence of acute and chronic diseases in adulthood. Consequently, we decided to explore this relationship," he adds.

Researchers conducted a prospective study of 348 people with CHD who had been admitted to the Cardiovascular Rehabilitation Unit of Fondazione Don Carlo Gnocchi in Milan. They also looked for other risk factors linked to being firstborn. They recorded birth order, age, gender, family history of CHD, and the presence of other major risk factors.

Researchers found that 46.7% of the CHD patients were firstborn, almost double the prevalence of 29.3% in the reference population. Primogeniture was unrelated to age, gender, and all but one of the major risk factors considered. There were no significant differences between firstborns and their sisters and brothers in terms of family history of CHD, Hypertension, Dyslipidemia, or Diabetes, but cigarette smoking was lower among the firstborns. The cumulative number of risk factors per patient was almost identical between the firstborns and their younger siblings.

"Because we found the same kinds of risk factors in both groups, we suspect that primogeniture is the likely explanation and should be regarded as a determinant of CHD that is independent of other risk factors studied," says Ferratini.

The study was not designed to identify the reasons for the prevalence of firstborns among CHD patients, but researchers say that personality may play a role because of the particular psychogenesis of firstborns.

"The family context frequently orients them along a perfectionist path, giving them a determined, competitive, winning, and aggressive attitude, aspects frequently observed in subjects with a type A personality also known as coronary-prone. Type A personality is characterized as being hard-driven, easy to anger, and highly motivated," says Ferratini.

"The study suggests that primogeniture may be an independent predisposing determinant of CHD that should be taken into account when assessing global patient risk," he says.

"How much being the eldest contributes to the onset of CHD remains to be clarified in further studies," he adds.

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