Lubbock's Link to WWII Can Be Found at Silent Wings Museum - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

6/30/08

Lubbock's Link to WWII Can Be Found at Silent Wings Museum

Lubbock's 100 year history is a rich one that has directly impact on world events - namely World War II.

In the early 1940s, Otto Lyons came to Lubbock to earn his wings. "It was just a progression and a need and this was just the wide open spaces to train on this kind of a cargo glider," Silent Wings Museum Curator Eddy Grisby said. 

Lyons was a World War II Glider Pilot. About 80 percent of the 6,000 glider pilots in World War II came to Lubbock to be trained at the South Plains Army Airfield, now Lubbock International Airport. While they were here they learned how to fly glider planes. Each glider could carry about 7,500 pounds of cargo.

Lyons now lives in Tennessee, but he enjoyed his time in Lubbock. "The people of Lubbock then, and still today, were tremendous. They just couldn't do enough for the service man who were stationed here," said Lyons.

That's why he's glad the museum was moved to Lubbock in 2002, and he keeps coming back every year to visit and volunteer. "It's one of a time, and it's very unique. It tells the story of the World War II glider pilots, and we're hoping it'll be here for a long time," Lyons adds.

The Silent Wings Museum commemorates a special World War II weapons system utilizing gliders, glider pilots, glider troops and their equipment and troop carrier units. The one-way trip of the glider pilots became history and the Silent Wings Museum is their legacy. The museum includes several exhibits including photographs, videos, and artifacts.

The first Silent Wings Museum opened in Terrell, Texas in 1984, but by 1997 the pilots realized that a more permanent museum home was needed. They selected Lubbock because a majority of the glider pilots were trained here.

The museum gets about 10,000 visitors each year. Click here to learn more about the Silent Wings Museum.

Museums & Galleries
From fine art to windmills, to fossils and military gliders, you'll find plenty to enlighten and entertain you right here in Lubbock & surrounding communities.

  • Local News on KCBD.comNewsMore>>

  • Mexico quake rescuers race to free girl, other survivors

    Mexico quake rescuers race to free girl, other survivors

    Wednesday, September 20 2017 2:33 AM EDT2017-09-20 06:33:01 GMT
    Wednesday, September 20 2017 9:28 PM EDT2017-09-21 01:28:50 GMT

    The earthquake struck on the 32nd anniversary of a 1985 temblor that killed thousands and came just two hours after earthquake drills were held across Mexico to mark the date.

    The earthquake struck on the 32nd anniversary of a 1985 temblor that killed thousands and came just two hours after earthquake drills were held across Mexico to mark the date.

  • Maria destroys homes, triggers flooding in Puerto Rico

    Maria destroys homes, triggers flooding in Puerto Rico

    Wednesday, September 20 2017 3:55 AM EDT2017-09-20 07:55:20 GMT
    Wednesday, September 20 2017 9:27 PM EDT2017-09-21 01:27:01 GMT

    Hurricane Maria ties for the eighth strongest storm in Atlantic history, when measured by wind speed. 

    Hurricane Maria ties for the eighth strongest storm in Atlantic history, when measured by wind speed. 

  • Trump: GOP health bill short of votes before deadline

    Trump: GOP health bill short of votes before deadline

    Wednesday, September 20 2017 4:24 AM EDT2017-09-20 08:24:59 GMT
    Wednesday, September 20 2017 9:26 PM EDT2017-09-21 01:26:45 GMT
    (AP Photo/Alex Brandon). Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., speaks to the media, accompanied by Senate Majority Whip Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., on Capitol H...(AP Photo/Alex Brandon). Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., speaks to the media, accompanied by Senate Majority Whip Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas, Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., on Capitol H...

    In a sign he remained short of votes, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell refused on Tuesday to commit to bringing the legislation up for a vote.

    In a sign he remained short of votes, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell refused on Tuesday to commit to bringing the legislation up for a vote.

Powered by Frankly