Lubbock's Set To Grow - KCBD NewsChannel 11 Lubbock

7/20/08

Lubbock's Set To Grow

Lubbock is set to do something it's been doing for the past 100 years - grow. During the past several city council meetings, discussions about land annexation have led to three parcels of land in the North, West and Southwest of the city to be on the table as the areas where city officials believe Lubbock will need room to grow.

"We generally try to annex vacant land or that have very few residences," said Lubbock Mayor Tom Martin.

A practice The City of Lubbock has been using for nearly a century.

"Over many years the city of Lubbock has adopted the position that annexing areas outside the city to plan for future growth and that's what it's all about," added Martin.

State law requires that annexed land have fewer than 100 residents. More than that makes the annexation process difficult unless the residents want to be annexed. In this planned annexation three areas are being discussed. The first is to the Southwest of the city - a section of land from 116th street south to CR1585 and between Milwaukee and Alcove Avenues.

Martin says, "The second area of priority is the area north of the city along I-27 and near Preston Smith International Airport."

And the third area is to the west - roughly the area of Upland Avenue between The Marsha Sharp Freeway and 34th street.

"Annexation is badly needed because of the need for orderly growth," said Councilman Paul Beene.

He's one man directly affected by any growth to the southwest of the city because with growth in that direction, his district will grow.

"So much of this raw land, especially south of our city is basically farm land. And what some of the land owners do not understand is that the AG exemption continues in place," said Beene.

So farm land owners don't need to worry about losing any government exemptions because of city annexation. Beane says exemptions will stay in place unless the land is later sold by the owner.

The annexation process is quite detailed. First city staffers prepare official notices to all property owners affected. Then, over several months, public meetings are held to keep the public informed and give them a way to speak for or against the annexation. Then the city prepares the official documents to show what city services will be provided to residents in those areas. Lastly a council vote to annex.

Mayor Martin says the process takes between 90 and 120 days and that's the time frame to start the annexation process in Southwest Lubbock.

Lubbock is set to do something it's been doing for the past 100 years - grow. During the past several city council meetings, discussions about land annexation have led to three parcels of land in the North, West and Southwest of the city to be on the table as the areas where city officials believe Lubbock will need room to grow.

"We generally try to annex vacant land or that have very few residences," said Lubbock Mayor Tom Martin.

A practice The City of Lubbock has been using for nearly a century.

"Over many years the city of Lubbock has adopted the position that annexing areas outside the city to plan for future growth and that's what it's all about," added Martin.

State law requires that annexed land have fewer than 100 residents. More than that makes the annexation process difficult unless the residents want to be annexed. In this planned annexation three areas are being discussed. The first is to the Southwest of the city - a section of land from 116th street south to CR1585 and between Milwaukee and Alcove Avenues.

Martin says, "The second area of priority is the area north of the city along I-27 and near Preston Smith International Airport."

And the third area is to the west - roughly the area of Upland Avenue between The Marsha Sharp Freeway and 34th street.

"Annexation is badly needed because of the need for orderly growth," said Councilman Paul Beene.

He's one man directly affected by any growth to the southwest of the city because with growth in that direction, his district will grow.

"So much of this raw land, especially south of our city is basically farm land. And what some of the land owners do not understand is that the AG exemption continues in place," said Beene.

So farm land owners don't need to worry about losing any government exemptions because of city annexation. Beane says exemptions will stay in place unless the land is later sold by the owner.

The annexation process is quite detailed. First city staffers prepare official notices to all property owners affected. Then, over several months, public meetings are held to keep the public informed and give them a way to speak for or against the annexation. Then the city prepares the official documents to show what city services will be provided to residents in those areas. Lastly a council vote to annex.

Mayor Martin says the process takes between 90 and 120 days and that's the time frame to start the annexation process in Southwest Lubbock.

 

Lubbock County Precinct Map
Unsure what precinct you're in? Check out this map of Lubbock County Voting Precincts. (You will need Adobe Acrobat to open this file)

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