American Academy of Family Physicians recognizes Texas Tech School of Medicine as Bright Spot for Future of Family Medicine

American Academy of Family Physicians recognizes Texas Tech School of Medicine as Bright Spot for Future of Family Medicine
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (Source: KCBD NewsChannel 11)

LUBBOCK, TX (KCBD) - According to a report by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP), trends show a projected deficit of 52,000 primary care physicians by 2025.

In the report, AAFP recognized a list of U.S. medical schools as “Bright Spots,” for making substantial contributions to the family medicine workforce, and Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC) School of Medicine was among them.

The TTUHSC School of Medicine was ranked in the top 8 of allopathic schools that provide long-term contributions to the family medicine workforce, and listed nationally within the top 20th percentile for total graduates entering into Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education – accredited family medicine residency programs over the past seven years.

The school also created the first three year medical degree approved by the nationally recognized accrediting authority for medical education.

Known as “The Family Medicine Accelerated Track (FMAT)” program, this method allows primary care students to complete their degree in three years at about half of the cost of the standard four-year program. The first FMAT class completed their family medicine residency training in 2016.

In a release from Texas Tech University, Steven Burk, M.D., TTUHSC executive vice president, provost and dean of the School of Medicine, said this program demonstrates the future path of medical education.

“The TTUHSC School of Medicine’s early adoption of an accelerated pathway opened a new road for the institution as a leader in curricular innovation,” Burk said. “The road ahead for medical education is likely to be linked less to time than to demonstrating proficiency in communicating with and caring for patients, and FMAT is one vehicle on that road.”

The AAFP report stated national organizations have set an ambitious goal of increasing the proportion of U.S. medical school graduates who enter family medicine residencies to 25 percent by 2030.

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