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Woman busted smuggling Fentanyl in vaginal cavity at Texas-Mexico border

During a secondary inspection, the woman allegedly acknowledged she was concealing narcotics...
During a secondary inspection, the woman allegedly acknowledged she was concealing narcotics within her vaginal cavity.(Customs and Border Protection)
Published: Oct. 4, 2021 at 11:34 AM CDT
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EL PASO, Texas (KWTX) - Customs and Border Protection officers working at a port of entry recently arrested a man and a woman allegedly trying to smuggle Fentanyl into the U.S. on their bodies two days in a row.

Fentanyl is a powerful synthetic opioid similar to morphine but 50 to 100 times more potent, according to federal health authorities.

“Seizures of this powerful synthetic opioid continue to rise dramatically all along the southwest border,” said CBP El Paso Director of Field Operations Hector A. Mancha.

“CBP officers remain vigilant and dedicated to disrupting the flow of this dangerous narcotic from entering our country and reaching our communities.”

The first arrest happened on September 28 when a 30-year-old man attempted to enter the U.S. at a port of entry.

The CBP officer noticed the man appeared to be nervous and referred him for a secondary inspection where a drug sniffing dog alerted to the odor of narcotics coming the man’s groin area.

A search resulted in the discovery of a little more than a quarter of a pound of fentanyl along with over one pound of methamphetamine.

On September 29, CBP officers assigned to another port of entry in the El Paso area found a little more than a tenth of a pound of fentanyl on a 48-year-old woman.

Officials said the woman was referred for a secondary inspection after she appeared to be nervous. During the search, the woman allegedly acknowledged she was concealing narcotics within her vaginal cavity.

CBP officers arrested the man and the woman and turned them over to federal authorities to face charges. The alleged drug smugglers were not identified.

Fentanyl is most commonly found in counterfeit pills, and is the primary driver of an “alarming increase” in overdose deaths, federal officials said.

Last week, the Drug Enforcement Administration issued its first public safety alert in six years to warn Americans of an alarming increase in the lethality and availability of fake prescription pills containing fentanyl and methamphetamine.

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